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Trump's Twitter password was picked up in 5 attempts

It turned out to be "maga2020!" - the slogan of the current president's election campaign. 24.jpg

Internet security expert, "ethical hacker" from the Netherlands Victor Gevers, known for being able to log into the account of US President Donald Trump in 2016, repeated his success in 2020, writes The Guardian, citing Dutch media.

Gevers last week was able to guess Trump's Twitter password on the fifth attempt, the newspaper writes. It turned out to be "maga2020!" - the slogan of the current president's election campaign.

The researcher was able to view Trump's private messages, was able to post tweets on his own behalf, and change profile information. By the way, two-factor authentication was disabled in the account of the President of the United States. Gevers admitted that when he realized what had happened, he had a mild panic attack. Suddenly he realized that he was controlling the account of the President of the United States with 87 million subscribers.

Gevers announced his discovery to the CIA, the FBI and Twitter himself. A day later, two-factor authentication appeared on Trump's account, and two days later he received a gratitude from the special services, the researcher claims. The Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant , which originally published the material , claims it has all the confirming screenshots at its disposal.

After logging into his account, Gevers sent an email to US-CERT, the Department of Homeland Security's cybersecurity arm, to report a security breach.

The expert wrote that Trump's password was unreliable, on Twitter and tagged the accounts of the CIA, White House, Trump administration and Twitter security services.

Including two-factor authentication for any owner of a verified account is an axiom and a matter of elementary common sense, the newspaper notes. On the other hand, Twitter strongly recommends but does not require it from users, and Trump's 2016 password was even simpler - yourefired.

A Twitter spokesman said it had no evidence to support the publication. According to him, Twitter has special protection for "high profile accounts associated with the US election campaign, including the federal branches of government."

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